All correspondence to our Glenferrie

Hospital Rooms 03 9819 6934 mobile

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury (ACL)

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury (ACL)

OVERVIEW

One of the most common knee injuries is an anterior cruciate ligament sprain or tear. Athletes who participate in high demand sports like soccer, football, and basketball are more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligaments. If you have injured your anterior cruciate ligament, you may require surgery to regain full function of your knee. This will depend on several factors, such as the severity of your injury and your activity level.

ANATOMY

Three bones meet to form your knee joint: your thighbone (femur), shinbone (tibia), and kneecap (patella). Your kneecap sits in front of the joint to provide some protection.

Bones are connected to other bones by ligaments. There are four primary ligaments in your knee. They act like strong ropes to hold the bones together and keep your knee stable.

COLLATERAL LIGAMENTS

These are found on the sides of your knee. The medial collateral ligament is on the inside and the lateral collateral ligament is on the outside. They control the sideways motion of your knee and brace it against unusual movement.

CRUCIATE LIGAMENTS

These are found inside your knee joint. They cross each other to form an “X” with the anterior cruciate ligament in front and the posterior cruciate ligament in back. The cruciate ligaments control the back and forth motion of your knee. The anterior cruciate ligament runs diagonally in the middle of the knee. It prevents the tibia from sliding out in front of the femur, as well as providing rotational (twisting) stability to the knee.

The ACL has two components (bundles) – one is tight when the knee is bent, and the other when the knee is extended (See image at right).

Normal knee anatomy.  The knee is made up of four main things: bones, cartilage, ligaments, and tendons.
Above: the two bundles of the ACL
For all after hours referrals fractures/broken bones CALL
0475 582 244 mobile
We aim to see all fractures within 24hrs